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2013WinShotcreteEMag

placement method. The use of two-sided forms would have lead to dramatically increased labor costs. Shotcrete also allowed the contractor to place concrete and build features on slopes as steep as 9 degrees. Access to the on-site work was also facilitated because the contractor was able to run hoses from the edge of the site to the shooting surfaces within the skatepark. Other placement methods would have required the use of expensive cranes or pumping equipment (refer to Fig. 4). The flexibility and ease of placement in the shotcrete process allowed North Burlington to enjoy a beautiful, affordable community gathering place for fun and recreation (refer to Fig. 5). David Youkhana is the Quality Control Coordi- nator for the City of Burlington’s Engineering Department with more Fig. 3: View of skatepark on opening day (note pigment variations) than 43 years of experience in municipal roads, bridges, and construction materials (including specialized asphalt, concrete, and pipes). Youkhana has a diploma in Civil Technology and is a member of the Ontario Association of Certified Engineering Technicians and Technologists. For the past 16 years, he has been a volunteer coordinator, instructor, and trainer in the Bituminous Technology course with the Ontario Good Roads organization. 2012 honorable mention Project Name City of Burlington— North Burlington Skatepark Project Location Burlington, ON, Canada Fig. 4: Ease of equipment access Shotcrete Contractor NewLine Skateparks Inc.* General Contractor Gateman Malloy GC Architect/Engineer NewLine Skateparks Inc.* Material Supplier/Manufacturer Dufferin Concrete/Putzmeister Concrete Pumps* Project Owner City of Burlington *Corporate Member of the American Shotcrete Association Fig. 5: North Burlington Skatepark completed Shotcrete • Winter 2013 47


2013WinShotcreteEMag
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