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2014WinShotcreteEMag

Fig. 2: Three-tier system of spa, main pool swimming area, and surge trough (Note: 1 in. = 25.4 mm) Angles and Edges The Donovan home is architecturally contem- porary with organic design themes present in both the house’s structure and the surrounding land- scape. The pool would therefore require both archi- tectural symmetry and fluid continuation of space. Drakeley Pool Company derived its in-house design of the pool from the school of John Lautner and his mentor, Frank Lloyd Wright. The recti- linear orientation of the pool was intended to echo the angles of the house, while the harnessing of vanishing-edge design would allow the eye to skim effortlessly over the surface of the water and into the vault of trees encompassing the space. The water would flow over the edge and into the surge tank, which was stabilized and locked into the ledge lower on the hillside. Fig. 3: Rock hammering and ledge removal Phase 1: Excavation and Footing Installation The Drakeley team began the project with an extensive period of rock hammering and ledge removal to carve the hillside to a buildable, work- able base (Fig. 3 and 4). They then installed three sections of cast-in-place footings and horizontal structural members (Fig. 5). Situated beneath these members was the keyway that anchored the pool structure into the rock. At this point, the Drakeley crews installed drainage mechanisms and subsurface drains necessary to control groundwater that, if left unchecked, could com- promise the stability of the hillside pool. Phase 2: Forming and Steel The next phase was forming and reinforcement installation (refer to Fig. 6). Forms were one- sided, rough-sawn lumber (2 x 4 in., 1 x 6 in. 50 x 100 mm, 25 x 150 mm), accompanied by sheets of plywood. Because half of the pool installation was to be an out-of-ground build, intricate Fig. 4: Rock hammering and ledge removal Shotcrete • Winter 2014 39


2014WinShotcreteEMag
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