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2014WinShotcreteEMag

Fig. 5: Cast-in-place concrete footing to support pool structure forming was required. Despite its complexity, the forming phase boasted impressive efficiency when compared to the forming more traditional concrete placement methods would require. Because the formwork did not need to be designed for internal pressures, one-sided forming was used. Drakeley Pool Company recorded approximately 50% labor and material savings over conventional formwork (as is visible in Fig. 7, the small cast-in-place sec- tion of the foundation concrete work required as much wood forming as the remainder of the entire pool). Furthermore, the reduction of labor increased the speed of construction by almost 50% because of the reduced (or eliminated) need for two-sided structural forms. All necessary plumbing was installed in keeping with LEED construction principles, employing low- Fig. 6: Intricate but efficient formwork, steel, and plumbing installation line velocity technology with large pipe diameters. prior to shotcrete placement The steel reinforcement was Grade 60, No.4 (Grade 420, No.13M) bar placed 6 in. (150 mm) on center in the walls and double mat on the vanishing-edge wall. All reinforcing steel was installed with suffi- cient rigidity to withstand the shotcreting pressures and was kept free from oil, dirt, and other contami- nants that could have affected performance. Phase 3: Shotcrete & Curing The shotcrete installation took place over a 3-day period. During the first day, Drakeley crews— ACI-certified nozzlemen and other qualified crew members—concentrated on the main pool swim- ming area and the vanishing-edge wall. The second and third days were designated for focus on the spa and surge trough areas. Despite the Fig. 7: Extensive formwork required for cast-in-place concrete relatively unimposing dimensions of the pool, the 40 Shotcrete • Winter 2014


2014WinShotcreteEMag
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