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2014SumShotcreteEMag

Those spots are still solid. They look like they were just shot last week” (Fig. 4). Repair Challenges The shotcrete crews faced many challenges performing the bridge repairs over the years. These included finding safe access to hard-to- reach locations as well as dealing with the same site conditions that make it a harsh environment for a bridge. “It’s a tough place to work some- times. There is rain, wind, tides, and fast currents. There’s no hiding from the elements on this bridge,” remarked Ayers. Coastal Gunite employed a truck-mounted aerial platform to access a majority of the under- deck work and swing-stage scaffolding to access the columns and footers (Fig. 5). Where feasible, barges were also used to access bent footers. In some locations, the current was too strong for access by water. “We had to get a snooper truck with a platform attached to get to some spots that we just couldn’t reach with our sys- tems,” said Ayers. “Also, we had to design our own access system for some spots because of some unique features of the bridge,” he added. Another obstacle was the requirement to vacate the bridge for regular survey inspec- tions. The department installed a series of points marked along 150 of the bridge’s 200 spans and uses mobile scanning technology to determine if any of those points have moved. Movement would indicate pile settling, among Fig. 4: Freshly shot pier column other things. Fig. 5: Shotcreting pier cap 22 Shotcrete • Summer 2014


2014SumShotcreteEMag
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