Page 20

2015SummerShotcreteEMag

Shotcrete in Landscape Design By James Scott W ects and repairs come to mind, such as Flora and fauna without water is an incompleteIn the natural world and landscape design, a coreelement is water. In fact, it may be the key element.-hen we think of the shotcrete process,mental images of large industrial proj tunnels, bridges, and drainage channels. If we picture. For those of us who are watershape keep thinking, we may think of smaller, human- designers and builders (for example, ponds, pools, scale recreational projects, such as swimming fountains, spas, and waterfalls), we sometimes pools and skate parks. If we think even further, think the watershape is the star of the show (a mis- however, we may just bring ourselves back to taken premise in the author’s opinion), and that the the very beginnings of shotcreting—where its surrounding elements carry a lower value. But, in inventor (Carl Akeley) used it for his craft as the natural world, water must carry an equal rela- a multi-disciplined naturalist. tionship with other elements in the overall environ- ment. Water must be presented in such a way that it takes no more than an equal footing with the other Modern-day designers and naturalists use the elements—landform, plant materials, ledge rock, process of shotcrete in the broad natural world of boulders, and the sun. This balance is first achieved landscape. So, from the beginning, through present in the mind of the designer, but water poses an day, shotcreting has been used as a means to help one interesting challenge. Water always conforms to represent and maintain elements of the natural world. In this landscape, a spa was built against the base of an aged outcropping of ledge rock. Previous attempts had been made to create some sort of circulation down the side of the rock with poor results. Besides not having a basin large enough to catch the falling water, there were several crevices and natural seams in the rock that allowed too much water to pass for continued use. While the spa was being built, with a conjoined recirculation basin, attention was given to the ledge rock issues. Some of the crevices were carefully widened by machine and hand, and then steel-reinforced “patches” were shotcreted into place. Some of the offending seams were simply covered over during this process. Care was taken to protect the surrounding rock, and with some careful rock placement and “aging” techniques, the patches proved quite successful 18 Shotcrete • Summer 2015


2015SummerShotcreteEMag
To see the actual publication please follow the link above