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the shape and influences of the vessel it occupies. And in nature, this could be a shallow depression; a deep, still lake, over a rippling placement of stone; or in footprints left by an animal. This is where the value of the shotcrete process comes into play. The shotcrete process has a long list of advan- tages that may already be known by the reader. For the landscape naturalist, there is a specific group of advantages that are appealing. • Because shapes in landscape are often not regular, shotcrete’s ability to be shaped into odd and irregular shapes is key. The ability to shape and carve it while in its plastic state is almost like a sculptor molding and shaping clay. • The naturalist must consider practical matters when it comes to handling water. There are plastic or metal recirculation systems, stone that is used for features, bedrock that may be the base for the shotcrete, and cementitious finishes or coloring agents applied to the shotcrete. The shotcrete process does not alter the concrete’s ability to marry well with these other materials. So, all the advantages of concrete are still available. • Often the designer wants water to move over an existing channel or crevice of natural rock. To help create a watertight surface, shotcrete For this garden water feature, naturally placed rock along with some masonry veneer was created in the rear of a residential property in a busy northeast city. In addition to its shaping abilities, shotcrete was selected as a means to combat the heavy freezing-and-thawing exposure the vessel would be subjected to. By digging to frost depth and installing a deep base of crushed stone, the shotcrete vessel has been leak-free for many years. The natural gunned finish was an easy way to create a suitable background for the interior spaces of the feature Shotcrete • Summer 2015 19


2015SummerShotcreteEMag
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