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2016WinterShotcreteEMag

2015 Outstanding Architecture | New Construction Project Sufism Reoriented Sanctuary By Jason Myers Sufism Reoriented is an American spiritual order that focuses on the principles of divine love as the central focus of their lives. They are in the process of constructing a permanent home in Walnut Creek, CA, that is nearing completion. The new sanctuary will be set among the serene gardens on 3 acres (12,000 m2) of land surrounding a suburban neighborhood. The structure was designed under the guidance of Murshida Carol Weyland Conner and the highly distinguished architectural firm Philip Johnson/Alan Ritchie with Soga and Associates being the Architect of Record. The project had its groundbreaking ceremony on May 24, 2012, and the sanctuary is expected to be completed in the middle of 2016. An important symbol to the order is the circle. The circle is expressed in the gently sloping saucer domes vaulting the Prayer Hall and the adjacent rooms. The outline of the domes was designed to reflect the soft, rolling hills that border the surrounding valley. Within the sanctuary, the domes create tranquil and uplifting interior spaces for prayer, meditation, and communion with God. The roof of the sanctuary consists of eight small domes, four medium domes, and in the center one large dome (refer to Fig. 1). The eight small domes have a diameter of 272 in. (6.91 m) with the design of the project having the small domes constructed out of fiberglass. The four medium domes have a diameter of 450 in. (11.43 m) and a height of 158 in. (4.01 m) with a concrete thickness of 7.5 in. (0.19 m) with an approximate area of 1500 ft2 (140 m2) each. The single large dome has a diameter of 76 ft (23.16 m) and a height of 258 in. (6.55 m) with a concrete thickness of 7.5 in. (0.19 m) with an approximate area of 5800 ft2 (540 m2). The concrete contractor, Overaa Construction out of Richmond, CA, was awarded the concrete portion of the project and had originally planned on casting the domes, but once the project got out of the estimating department into the construction phase, they realized that cast-in-place was not the best solution. At this point, Overaa Construction started conversations with Dees-Hennessey, Inc., about the possibilities for using shotcrete (refer to Fig. 2(a) and (b)). Shotcrete proved an ideal solution for the domes as the complexity of the formwork was eliminated and the architectural features of the domes could immediately be seen and evaluated by the owner, contractor, and Dees-Hennessey to ensure the domes were geometrically correct before the shotcrete setup and make corrections if needed during placement. A full-height section of the dome was constructed as a preconstruction test panel to qualify the nozzlemen as well as to confirm the architectural finish was acceptable for the general contractor, architect, and owner. Each of the domes had an opening in the top of the dome (oculus). This required the concrete contractor to start each of the domes by casting a concrete compression ring around the base and at the top of each dome to lock in the reinforcing bars and the structural frame of the structure. Each of the medium-sized domes was shot monolithically during a single mobilization. Due to the size and weight of the large dome, it was split into six sections and two nonadjacent sections Fig. 1: Outside view of domes were shot during the three mobilizations to com 18 Shotcrete • Winter 2016


2016WinterShotcreteEMag
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