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2016WinterShotcreteEMag

Fig. 5: The use of a blow wand, seen in the hands of the gentleman with the red shirt, is critical to maintaining quality throughout the project option, so we stored 125 tons (113,000 kg) of sand nearby with a loader, where we kept the material dry until it was needed. We had a relationship with a local ready mix provider who supplied us with our cement reloads (conveniently located near our sand pile). Our material reloads were nearby, so we only needed two batch trucks traveling back and forth for the job. The jobsite was extremely congested, so we coordinated with the general contractor on the job to minimize other sub-trades during our shoot, so that we had room for our compressor truck and the material batch trucks. We exercised a great deal of control over our aggregate (sand) pile. To start, we used sand from the same pit that our mixture design was based on so that variations in aggregate were minimal. Then we placed the large pile of sand on a concrete slab so that soil contamination was not an issue. Finally, we covered the pile to prevent moisture gain from the daily mountain rains, as well as preventing windborne contaminates, such as leaves, from entering the pile. One of the benefits the crew experienced was my relationship with a local chef, who we contracted to prepare food for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. The chef would show up at the rental house and have food ready by 4:30 a.m. so the crew could be out the door shortly thereafter. Then lunch was served on the jobsite and dinner was ready when they returned. I feel this is important for morale when a crew is working out of town, doing what is already hard work and not having time to go get food. We don’t always get this luxury, but we do strive for it in some form every time we work out of town. The crew loves it and we are happy to provide this as a small gesture of our appreciation. A Final Note Although a swimming pool can be built with a cast-in-place method, the shotcrete process greatly facilitates the installation, particularly when building a detailed pool that has multiple gutters, tight waterline tolerances, and a glass tile interior surface (Fig. 6). In this case, reducing forming and, moreover, reducing time, was a serious benefit for the general contractor and owners, having lost so much time due to the previous situation. The shotcrete method was perfect for the construction of this pool. Trying to build the forms necessary for the vanishing edges and small gutters is possible but not nearly as efficient as simply building a onesided form to shoot onto. The added strength and durability of the shotcrete process, dry or wet, through the compaction of the concrete is of great benefit when dealing 28 Shotcrete • Winter 2016


2016WinterShotcreteEMag
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