Page 58

2016SpringShotcreteEMag

Safety Shooter Traffic Construction Safety To work safely in and around heavy traffic there are many things to be concerned about. First and foremost is setting up an appropriate traffic pattern. The signing and the requirements are detailed in your state or municipality DOT traffic standards. The requirements vary for two- and four-lane roads, lane closures, and the many different traffic configurations. Working situations may involve flaggers, the need for arrow boards or message boards, crash trucks to protect the crew in their work area, and energyabsorbing traffic attenuators to protect the motorists. All these requirements must be followed. In addition to the standard construction traffic control procedures, shotcrete operations add additional concerns. Because of the nature of shotcrete work, tarps and barriers are often necessary to protect the passing motorists. In shotcrete repair and rehabilitation of bridges and tunnels, the removal of deteriorated concrete can make it necessary for the erection of platforms to collect the concrete debris and keep it off the roadways. The same can be said for the shotcrete placement phase of the work, where there is a need to protect the motorists from the material overspray and rebound. On slope protection projects, when adjacent to the roadway, it is often necessary to establish lane closures or install barriers for the same reasons (refer to Fig. 1 and 2). On heavily traveled highways, the state and its cities try to maintain the flow of traffic. Oftentimes, because of political pressure, great efforts are made to avoid inconveniencing the driving public. This often necessitates working in off-peak traffic hours at night or on weekends. Working at night necessitates extra precautions with additional lighting, light plants, and high-visibility safety apparel. As with other construction, it is necessary to wear the proper personal protective equipment at all times. This typically includes high-visibility and reflective safety clothing, vests, hardhats, Fig. 1: Wooden barriers are installed in place along I-376 by the Fort Pitt Tunnel in Pittsburgh to protect traffic during the shotcrete placement of this soil nail wall By Ted Sofis 56 Shotcrete • Spring 2016


2016SpringShotcreteEMag
To see the actual publication please follow the link above