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2017WinterShotcreteEMag

permanent wall face over a mechanically stabilized earthen structure and over a soldier pile wall. Existing form-and-pour walls were overlaid with shotcrete that was then textured to appear as large sections of native bedrock. Cantilevered retaining walls were formed on one side and built with shotcrete. Two bridge abutments were installed using shotcrete that allowed viewers to walk over the elephants’ space. In each case, the structural method was chosen for its cost effectiveness and schedule benefits, and in each case the shotcrete process was central to the method elected. Ultimately, these structures were camouflaged using naturally textured shotcrete, which allowed them to blend in as an element of the elephants’ natural habitat. Shotcrete’s superior adhesion qualities were important to many facets of the work. The construction and finished result of Elephant Lands is a testament to the versatility of shotcrete. Over 1250 yd3 (956 m3) of shotcrete was placed with ACI Certified Nozzlemen in the exhibit scope of work, and five different mixture designs were created to meet the shotcrete requirements of the project, including waterproofing, slumping soil by building erosional remnants of the same soil in the area below the eroded section of wall—a subtle effect but one that strengthened the intended illusion and allowed further opportunities for the elephants to rub against different shotcrete textures. The project included two water-containing structures— one being a large pool able to accommodate up to 10 mature elephants and deep enough to allow them to fully submerge. These watertight shotcrete structures were placed monolithically. Both pools accommodated complex support systems crucial to the elephants’ health that required detailing our finishes around 40 pipe penetrations. The construction of these pools also entailed slab textures carefully detailed to be friendly to elephant feet. These water features have proven to be efficacious at inspiring play among members of the herd. Other applications of the shotcrete method included the lagging for top-down shoring techniques that were used to tuck a large building up against a hillside to keep it out of the sightlines of the public, again while saving the mature landscape above. Shotcrete was also used to provide a Fig. 5: Finished bedrock textures included painted lichens native to the Asian habitat Fig. 7: Mother Rose-Tu and baby Lily cavorting in their new pool Fig. 8: The youngest member of the herd exploring her new habitat Fig. 6: Part of the Oregon Zoo elephant herd traveling through their new exhibit 20 Shotcrete | Winter 2017 www.shotcrete.org


2017WinterShotcreteEMag
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