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2017WinterShotcreteEMag

2016 Outstanding International Project Holcim New Zealand Cement Terminal By Benjamin Davis In 2013, Holcim New Zealand, a part of the Lafarge- Holcim Group, set out to design and build two cement storage terminals in New Zealand. With earthquake devastation in mind following severe earthquakes in 2010 (Stuff Reporters 2010) and 2011 (CNN 2011), finding a durable bulk storage structure resilient enough to handle seismic events and a company with a verifiable track record of building such buildings was paramount. Holcim described the entire project as consisting of two 33,000 ton (30,000 tonne) capacity dome silos, two 660 ton/hr (600 tonne/hr) pneumatic ship unloaders, a 720 ton/hr (650 tonne/hr) ship loader at Timaru, and bulk cement tanker loading facilities, all supported by equipment auxiliary buildings, office buildings, roadways, security, and dispatch facilities for a total cost of NZ$105 million (USD$70.8 million) (Williams and Cowie 2016). The storage domes would be built on two ports and had to be aesthetically pleasing, environmentally friendly, costeffective, and allow as sustainable an operation as possible. Their thorough evaluation of various types of storage structures selected concrete domes as the best choice. In the end, Domtec International was chosen as the preferred dome vendor in a “Best for Project” approach (Downer Group 2014). Two sites were chosen for Holcim’s domes. On the South Island, the dome was to be built in Timaru, a port city approximately 93 miles (150 km) south of Christchurch. The other dome would be located on the North Island in the most populous city in the country, Auckland, with a regional population of over 1.4 million (New Zealand Government, 2013). This article focuses on the project built in Timaru, on New Zealand’s South Island, although both domes are pictured and explained in this article. WHY A SHOTCRETE DOME? Although Domtec had built for Holcim in other parts of the world, this was the first shotcrete dome to be built for the storage of cement in Australasia and was quite an innovative design and technique. Holcim cited several reasons for choo sing a dome over traditional slip-form or jump-form cylindrical concrete silos, steel silos, or warehouse-type storage silos. Economy and speed of construction were the key factors in choosing a dome, but there were others, such as: • Control over environmental impact during construction and operation phases due to the weather tightness and dust control properties of the dome. The external air-form and the polyurethane foam lining provide excellent insula- Fig. 1: Aerial view of Holcim Cement Terminal in Auckland, New Zealand. Dome is 135.2 ft (41.2 m) diameter and 90.2 ft (27.5 m) tall and stores 33,000 tons (30,000 tonnes) of cement powder and used 1400 yd3 (1100 m3) of shotcrete to construct Fig. 2: Aerial view of Holcim Cement Terminal in Timaru, New Zealand. Dome is 118.1 ft (36 m) in diameter and 103.3 ft (31.5 m) tall and stores 33,000 tons (30,000 tonnes) of cement powder and used 1923 yd3 (1470 m3) of shotcrete to construct 26 Shotcrete | Winter 2017 www.shotcrete.org


2017WinterShotcreteEMag
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