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2017WinterShotcreteEMag

After design was complete, it was time to move onto construction. At this point, however, it was getting late in 2014. The build team did some research and called around to get information on which swimming pool builders were capable of building a pool this size with the complications that go along with building a pool next to the ocean in the winter and do it correctly. The team ended up deciding in August 2014 that they wanted SSG to build their new pool. In their research, they found that no other pool builder in their area met the criteria they were looking for. With a desired start date in September 2014, the build team asked SSG if they could begin the project. Unfortunately, that late in 2014, there was not room in SSG’s construction schedule to complete the project in time for an opening on Memorial Day 2015. Thus, the Coveleigh Club’s build team decided to put the construction on hold for 1 year so SSG would be available to build their pool. Construction started when the club’s pool was closed for the winter in September 2015. First, the existing pool and adjacent area were demolished and the excavation brought down to as much as 6 ft (1.8 m) below finish pool floor elevation to install the piles and grade beams. Working on a constantly wet and mucky site in the winter makes everything move slowly. The pool construction team was not able to start anything until December 2015, just in time for winter. The somewhat mild winter helped with the construction process, but it was still cold. Throughout the majority of the construction of the pool structure, the nights were below freezing with the occasional day where it might have reached 50°F (10°C) for 5 minutes in the afternoon but for the most part we were working in below-freezing weather. Under-pool piping was installed, which included a maze of schedule 80 polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipes ranging from 2 in. (50 mm) for the returns up to 12 in. (300 mm) for the main drains. The plumbing had to be coordinated to fit in and through the grade beam system that supports the pool structure from settling or floating. Setting the formwork followed the installation of the grade beams, PVC piping, and final stone grade. Forms consisted of 2 x 4 in. (51 x 102 mm) and 1 x 3 in. (25 x 76 mm) lumber, strapping, and stay-in-place expanded steel mesh. The 2 x 4 in. (51 x 102 mm) pieces were used for the main supports, with the smaller 1 x 3 in. (25 x 76 mm) lumber used to tie the 2 x 4 in. (51 x 102 mm) pieces together and support the steel mesh. This forming system is pretty minimal, as it only needs to support the impact of the shotcrete from the nozzle and help keep the walls upright. It consists of far less material and erection time than forms that would support the weight of fluid concrete. After the shotcrete cures, the lumber is stripped and the stay-in-place steel mesh remains on the back side of the wall that will be backfilled. After the forms came time for installation of the reinforcing bars. While on 99% of SSG jobs installation of all reinforcement is completed in-house, this job was a little different. This pool contained 50 tons (45 metric tons) of reinforcing bar ranging from No. 4 to No. 7 (No. 10M to No. 12M), all arranged in double mats in the walls and floors. The decision was made to subcontract this job to Merkel Rebar from Pennsylvania, as they had the capability to install all this reinforcing bar in under 3 weeks. A 12-person crew installed the reinforcing bar, including the Merkel Fig. 2: 50 tons (45 metric tons) of reinforcing bar being installed www.shotcrete.org Winter 2017 | Shotcrete 33


2017WinterShotcreteEMag
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