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2017SummerShotcreteEMag

| GOIN’ UNDERGROUND Underground at Mines By Michael Mooney In 2011, realizing a need to identify a unifying program dedicated to underground construction and tunneling education across campus, Colorado School of Mines established the Center for Underground Construction and Tunneling, or generally referred to as “Underground at Mines.” Core faculty members from civil engineering, geological engineering, and mining engineering work together to provide Mines students with an interdisciplinary curriculum and provide the industry with focused research projects relevant to current underground challenges and development. Over the last 6 years, additional departments on campus have joined the efforts, including mechanical engineering, computer science, and geophysics. The core faculty has grown from three to eight, ensuring students involved in Center research and courses are receiving an all- encompassing education. Underground at Colorado School of Mines operates with two primary goals: preparing leaders through educational programs and advancing knowledge through research and development. Underground at Mines educates both undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates can enroll in any number of underground-related courses, participate in independent study research, attend the biweekly industry lunch-and-learn series, and attend field trips to underground projects. Graduate students (both masters and doctorate levels) can pursue degree programs in civil, geological, mining, geophysics, and more, or enroll in the newly developed Underground Construction and Tunnel Engineering (UCTE) masters or doctoral program. The UCTE graduate degree program—the only such program in North America—is an interdisciplinary blend of civil, geological, and mining engineering that reflects the modern-day practice of underground engineering. The program attracts the best and brightest from around the world. Educational efforts span beyond the classroom, with field trips, conference trips, and internships for students on project sites. For example, in March 2017, a group of 17 graduate and Fig. 1: Graduate student looking at the ground-freezing techniques used in the cross-passage construction on the SR99 tunnel in Seattle 34 Shotcrete | Summer 2017 www.shotcrete.org


2017SummerShotcreteEMag
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